Linocut Process

Linoleum or Linocut print making is a technique similar to woodcuts, in which a sheet of linoleum is used for the relief surface. A design is cut into the linoleum surface with a sharp knife, V-shaped chisel or a gouge, with the raised (uncarved) areas to be inked for printing. The linoleum sheet is inked with a roller (called a brayer), and then impressed onto paper or fabric. The printing is done by hand rubbing with a wooden spoon or other tools made for that purpose and can also be done with a press. The traditional way of printing is to cut a separate plate for each color.

Another technique is the reduction method. This is when a multicolored print is made with the use of a single plate. Through a series of progressive cuttings, inkings, and printings, the image slowly emerges while the actual plate is destroyed. A reduction print can therefore never be reprinted.

Linocut Tools

Tools for carving and rollers for inking the sheet of linoleum.
The ink is spread on the glass first and then rolled onto the plate in several thin layers.

The ink is spread on the glass first and then rolled onto the plate in several thin layers.
Registration Jig for Lincocut Printing

The inked plate is placed on the registration jig where the paper is taped. After dropping the paper down, the paper can be printed by hand rubbing with a wooden spoon or running the plate and paper through the press.
Spoon used by Artist Peter A. Durand to test the first print of a linocut
Printing Press for Linocut